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Equality and Diversity to be examined in the Events Industry

EventHuddle, a topical debate focused on the UK events industry recently discussed gender quality in the events sector. The consensus reached was that employers need to do more to uphold equality and diversity within the sector.

2Heads commercial director, Jane Baker highlighted the problem facing British society by insisting that; “It’d be really lovely if we all lived in a perfect world, but it’s the sad situation that we don’t. The number of women in high profile positions around the UK is not representative of our society in general. I think there’s a massive need for women-only initiatives.”

Despite the fact that women are gaining increasing power and influence and society, many would argue that there is still a huge amount to do to balance things out. Women now represent more of the UK workforce than ever before, however, statistics seem to imply that men still take up most of the high profile jobs.

As of March 2014, women held 10 of 37 of the senior positions in Whitehall. That makes just 27%. Similarly, in English councils only 28% of chief executives were women, but local political leaders were composed of a mere 12.3% of female council leaders. In Westminster, 22% of females were MP’s, compared to 35% making up Scottish MSP’s. Institutional sexism and gender inequality can be seen to still be prevalent through these figures.

During the debate, SECC Head of Business Development, Samme Allen argued for the need for greater gender and ethnic diversity in the workplace in order to drive profits. “It’s an absolute fact that we should be promoting gender and ethnic diversity in this industry. You have to create diversity because diversity will increase profits,” she said.

“I think it’s great there’s a mentoring system out there and that someone’s actually had the balls to do it; we should applaud Fay. But we need to bang the drum a lot more.”

The panel discussed how motherhood could be one of the key factors which could explain how women’s careers were often less developed than men’s. TBA Business Development Manager, Max Fellows said; “I think parenthood is one of the key reasons that there is this difference at board level. It tends to make that gap even wider. Initiatives are important, but there should be something else.

“In agencies of 30 to 40 people there is often a distinct lack of HR, you still have an office manager doing a dual role. Someone should be regulating it better.”

The debate was closed by the participants being thanked for their input, and by each agreeing that the key to combating the inequality would be to push bosses and companies to make choices based on merit alone.

EventHuddle, a topical debate focused on the UK events industry recently discussed gender quality in the events sector. The consensus reached was that employers need to do more to uphold equality and diversity within the sector.

2Heads commercial director, Jane Baker highlighted the problem facing British society by insisting that; “It’d be really lovely if we all lived in a perfect world, but it’s the sad situation that we don’t. The number of women in high profile positions around the UK is not representative of our society in general. I think there’s a massive need for women-only initiatives.”

Despite the fact that women are gaining increasing power and influence and society, many would argue that there is still a huge amount to do to balance things out. Women now represent more of the UK workforce than ever before, however, statistics seem to imply that men still take up most of the high profile jobs.

As of March 2014, women held 10 of 37 of the senior positions in Whitehall. That makes just 27%. Similarly, in English councils only 28% of chief executives were women, but local political leaders were composed of a mere 12.3% of female council leaders. In Westminster, 22% of females were MP’s, compared to 35% making up Scottish MSP’s. Institutional sexism and gender inequality can be seen to still be prevalent through these figures.

During the debate, SECC Head of Business Development, Samme Allen argued for the need for greater gender and ethnic diversity in the workplace in order to drive profits. “It’s an absolute fact that we should be promoting gender and ethnic diversity in this industry. You have to create diversity because diversity will increase profits,” she said.

“I think it’s great there’s a mentoring system out there and that someone’s actually had the balls to do it; we should applaud Fay. But we need to bang the drum a lot more.”

The panel discussed how motherhood could be one of the key factors which could explain how women’s careers were often less developed than men’s. TBA Business Development Manager, Max Fellows said; “I think parenthood is one of the key reasons that there is this difference at board level. It tends to make that gap even wider. Initiatives are important, but there should be something else.

“In agencies of 30 to 40 people there is often a distinct lack of HR, you still have an office manager doing a dual role. Someone should be regulating it better.”

The debate was closed by the participants being thanked for their input, and by each agreeing that the key to combating the inequality would be to push bosses and companies to make choices based on merit alone.

Written By:

Daniel James
www.danieljamesbio.com
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