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Black community overrepresented within the Criminal Justice system

Statistics published earlier this week for the year ending 2006/7 by the Ministry of Justice show a huge disparity in experience for people from ethnic minorities and their white counterparts. Britain’s ethnic minorities, particularly the black community are statistically more likely to be stopped, searched, cautioned, arrested and imprisoned.

Snapshot of findings

Stop and Search

Relative to the general population, Black people were seven times more likely to be stopped and searched than White people, a similar rate to the previous years findings. Asian people were twice as likely to be stopped and searched than White people, again, a similar rate to the previous year.

Prosecution

Relative to the general population, Black people were 3.6 times more likely to be arrested

Prisons

In June 2007, members of BAME groups accounted for 26% of the total prison population

Recruitment

With the exception of the prison service, the criminal justice system is below its recruitment quotas for BAME communities, further more many of those employed are in junior roles


The findings reflect little progress since Sir William Macpherson labelled the police “institutional racist” following the Stephen Lawrence enquiry.  Only a week ago the Evening Standard had reported that senior MP’s had accused the Met police of still being dogged by Institutional Racism.

However focusing on the Criminal Justice system may not provide all the answers, there are surely many economic and social factors which are also contributory to the inequality experienced by ethnic minorities.

Click the link below for access to the full report

Full Report

Ends

posted by

Asif Yusuf
Publisher

 

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